Social and Emotional Learning (SEL)

Social and emotional learning (SEL) is a process through which children and adults learn to understand and manage their emotions and relationships. This includes developing (or enhancing) the ability to demonstrate caring and concern for others, establish positive relationships, make responsible decisions, value and address diversity, and handle challenging situations effectively. SEL creates a foundation for academic achievement, maintenance of good physical and mental health, parenting, citizenship, and productive employment. SEL helps create a positive school environment. If there are positive conditions for learning, and the capacity for SEL is built, then the result is greater capacity and engagement on the part of the children. There is less problematic behavior and better academic results. The development of SEL competencies is important for child and adolescent development, and these competencies form the basis of a student's ability to respond to "academic frustrations, inappropriate adult behavior, and antisocial peer behavior (Osher, Sprague, Axelrod, Keenan, Weissberg, Kendziora, & Zins, 2007)." SEL contributes to successful academic outcomes, safe environments, and the ability of children and youth to make successful transitions.

  • General Info
  • Strategies & Practices
  • Tools
  • On The Ground
  • Other
General Info: 

NDTAC Brief: Improving Conditions for Learning for Youth Who Are Neglected or Delinquent

(2008) National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At Risk (NDTAC)

Learning is not just a cognitive process; research shows that powerful social and emotional factors affect learning. By providing students with support that addresses these needs and building positive social and emotional conditions for learning, staff in facilities and schools can help improve learning outcomes that cannot be addressed through academic remediation alone.

The Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL)

CASEL’s mission is to establish social and emotional learning (SEL) as an essential part of education. The Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) describes SEL as a process for teaching individuals the skills necessary to effectively and ethically handle themselves, their relationships, and their work. These skills include the recognition and management of self-emotions, the development of care and concern for others, the establishment of positive relationships, and the ability to make responsible decisions and handle challenging situations. Resources provided by CASEL include information on policies, research, strategies, and tools such as a Practice Rubric for Schoolwide SEL Implementation, SEL Implementation Guide and Toolkit, and a SEL School Self-Assessment Guide.  

Social and Emotional Learning

(2011) The National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention at Education Development Center (EDC)

This article describes the core competencies and benefits of Social and Emotional Learning.

Strategies for Social and Emotional Learning: Preschool and Elementary Grade Student Learning Standards and Assessment

(2011) The National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention at Education Development Center (EDC) and  the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL)

This publication provides Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) project directors (PDs) with information and strategies to implement and assess Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) in their schools.

Leading an SEL School: Steps to implement social and emotional learning for all students

(2011) The National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention at Education Development Center (EDC) and  the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL)

This brief highlights the role that an SEL approach can play in accomplishing the five Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) elements; summarizes research on the importance of school leaders in successfully implementing schoolwide SEL; outlines 10 steps toward implementation of a sustainable, high-quality, schoolwide SEL program; and shares practical advice, lessons learned, and tools for implementing and sustaining SEL programming.  

Social Emotional Learning

(2013) National Association of School Boards of Education  (NASBE)

The recognized need for public schools to support students in areas beyond academics is not new, but recent developments in social-emotional learning (SEL) go beyond what has come before—and are starting to show improvements in both student behavior and academic outcomes.  This From Practice to Policy policy brief, the first issue in the new series  from NASBE, looks at the scope of SEL policies and initiatives in states that promote students’ social-emotional well-being and character growth.


Strategies & Practices: 

The SEL School: Connecting Social and Emotional Learning to Effective Teaching


(2013) The Center on Great Teachers and Leaders


Great teachers do more than promote the student's academic learning–they teach the whole child. Social and emotional learning (SEL) is critical to the introduction of college and career readiness standards, which increase the demands on students' ability to engage in deeper learning, and shift the focus and rigor of instruction. This resource helps teachers, school and district leaders, and state education agencies collaborate in connecting social and emotional learning to effective teaching.


The SEL School: Connecting Social and Emotional Learning to Effective Teaching


(2013) The Center on Great Teachers and Leaders


Great teachers do more than promote the student's academic learning–they teach the whole child. Social and emotional learning (SEL) is critical to the introduction of college and career readiness standards, which increase the demands on students' ability to engage in deeper learning, and shift the focus and rigor of instruction. This resource helps teachers, school and district leaders, and state education agencies collaborate in connecting social and emotional learning to effective teaching.


- See more at: http://supportiveschooldiscipline.org/learn/reference-guides/conditions-learning-cfl#sthash.VSYIXauA.dpuf

Other: 

References

Osher, D., Sprague, S., Axelrod, J., Keenan, S., Weissberg, R., Kendziora, K., & Zins, J. (2007). A comprehensive approach to addressing behavioral and academic challenges in contemporary schools.  In J. Grimes & A. Thomas (Eds.), Best practices in school psychology (5th ed.; pp. 1263–1278). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists.